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KEY ACTORS
A
PROVIDER
B
INTIMATE PARTNER(S) AND FAMILY MEMBERS
C
FRIENDS
D
CLASSMATES AND COLLEAGUES
E
CLIENT
F
COMMUNITY LEADERS
G
COMMUNITY MEMBERS
H
RELIGIOUS INSTITUTIONS
I
COMMUNITY-BASED ORGANIZATIONS
J
SUPERVISORS
K
FACILITY LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT
L
PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATIONS
M
INSTRUCTORS AND MENTORS
N
ACCREDITATION AND TRAINING ORGANIZATIONS
O
HEALTH SYSTEM
P
INTERNATIONAL BODIES
Q
GOVERNMENT AGENCIES
R
DONORS
 

MENTORS, COLLEAGUES, AND INSTRUCTORS.                       ** COMMUNITY LEADERS

Perceived norms

Health literacy

Expertise and skills

Gender competency

Power dynamics

Healthcare approach

Goals

Perceived role

Commitment

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Enforcement and compliance

Policies and laws

Access to services

Commodity supply chains

Technical assistance

Social andeconomic context

Gender equality

Empathy toward client

Individual mindset

Identity

Personality type

Past experiences

Perceived autonomy

Bias and partiality

Attitudes and values

Self-Efficacy

Family planning prioritization

Health system culture

Targets and auditing

Personal stressors

Political context and priorities

Donor ideologiesand incentives

Financial resources

for healthcare

Relationship type with partner(s)

Relationship gender dynamics

Support and trust                 

Relationship health

Communication

Attitudes, values, and behaviors

Culture and religion

Family roles

Social networks

Attitudes, values and behaviors

Social Networks

Social support and trust

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Health literacy

Healthcare experiences

Healthcare preferences

Expectations for care

Relationship dynamics

Experiences of violence

Agency and power

Authority bias

Perception

Community organization

Accountability measures

Community leaders

Emotional activators

Expectations for care

Community definition of quality 

Healthcare preferences

Social stigma

Gender norms

Socio-cultural norms

Discrimination

Religious influences

Social sanctions

Health mis/disinformation

Staff roles and expectations

Community-facility dynamics

Staffing levels and workload

Hierarchy and power dynamics

Skills and capabilities

Measurement and quality assurance

Processes and procedures

Training and development

Service delivery integration

Resource availability

Geographic location 

Physical environment

Facility type 

Gender competency

Organizational culture

Leadership and management

Recognition and growth

Professional bodies

Perceived support

Contracts and compensation

Ministry and agency roles

Career advancement

Policies

Healthcare costs

Resource management

Coordination systems

Guidelines and protocols

Provider support structures

Provider training and development

Gender competency

Monitoring and evaluation

Administrative tools

Profesional networks              

Religious leaders

Community leaders

Identity

Attitudes and values

Financial resources

Self-Efficacy

*
**

To begin thinking about factors influencing provider behavior in your context, use this worksheet as you review the map. This worksheet will help you document early assumptions about what does and does not influence provider behavior in your setting. You can then conduct assessments and apply tools together with providers and other relevant stakeholders to identify the most influential factors and check them against initial assumptions in this worksheet.

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These printable cards are useful in work planning sessions or design workshops to think through all the factors that could influence provider behavior in your context and make decisions, together with providers and other stakeholders, about which ones your initiative should address.

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